Thermobalancing Therapy Review

Kidney stones have recently become a major problem for many people, with no thanks to poor water intake, an even poorer diet, and lack of activity. Kidney stones can also come as a result of genetics. There are many different kidney stone-related therapies available, with some of them involving ingestion of pills, others advocating for a stricter diet, and still others for a combination of both. There are also gadgets, however, that are marketed as the answer to the problem of kidney stones. One of these is thermobalancing therapy, which uses heat. But does it work?

Overview

Thermobalancing therapy is a result of the work of Dr. Simon Allen, whose research has led him to believe that many health-related problems are due to the lack of temperature balance in the body. As a result, Dr. Allen has developed thermo-elements, which are attached to the body and which supposedly jumpstart the body's immune system. Thermobalancing therapy has no negative side effects and is non-invasive. It can be used to treat problems in the lower back, prostate, lower vertebrae, and kidneys, including kidney stones.

Theory

According to Dr. Allen, thermobalancing therapy is no different from using hot water bottles and thermal pads. However, thermobalancing therapy does not overheat the body. Rather, it keeps heat at a constant level for a specific area by accumulating the heat in the body. This constant supply of heat supposedly increases blood flow, which then creates the right environment for the body's blood vessels to supply nutrients to vital organs. This increased nutrient flow can prevent health problems. Thermobalancing therapy also purportedly dissolves kidney stones.

According to Dr. Allen, kidney stones are caused by the accumulation of minerals at the ends of the blood vessels that supply the kidneys with nutrients. The kidney stones then lodge in the various tubes going in and out of the kidneys, clogging them and causing pain. Therefore, to remove kidney stones, and according to this model, one only needs to improve blood circulation to the kidneys. This blood circulation should be carried out in the long term to prevent the formation of more kidney stones.

Products

Thermobalancing therapy has various heating pads that can be worn around the body, and with minimal loss of mobility. One of them is the device that caters primarily to kidney stones. According to the website, the device should dissolve kidney stones easily and with no pain, regardless of type or size. Also, the device supposedly has no side effects and will go to the root cause of kidney stones, as well as prevent further formation of kidney stones. The device increases blood flow to the kidneys, which, according to Dr. Allen, will remove the stones naturally without the need for harmful, invasive procedures. Smaller stones will take a few months to disappear, while bigger stones can take up to a year to remove using the thermobalancing therapy method.

How To Use It

The thermobalancing therapy device fits around the waist, with the heating elements in the back, on top of where the kidneys are located. A person with kidney stones should use the device all day, even at home. The belt can be adjusted to the body's shape and should not remove mobility.

Manufacturer

Dr. Allen is the creator of the device. According to several review websites, he is a medical professional who specialized in cardio-vascular diseases and internal medicine. He reportedly worked with patients post-heart attack, those with kidney problems, people suffering from prostate conditions, and people with metabolic disorders. His company is Fine Treatment, which produces and markets thermobalancing therapy.

Price

The thermobalancing therapy device for kidney stones costs $155 on the official site of Fine Treatment.

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My name is Neville Pettersson and kidneypedia is my site. I hope you find it useful. I try to keep it updated frequently. I’m just a regular guy, married with 2 kids. I’ve created this site to help people find good info about cold sores. You can follow me on Facebook, Twitter and Google+